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(Award-winning) light pollution research at USC undergraduate symposium

We participated in force in the 20th University of Southern California Undergraduate Symposium for Scholarly and Creative Work. Our contributions included: Classification System for National Park Sites Based on Nightscape Lighting Profiles (Harrison Knapp and Benjamin Banet) Spatiotemporal Analysis of Lighted Boats at Night (Eliza Gutierrez-Dewar) A Photographic Light Pollution Assessment Across Western Public Lands … Continue reading (Award-winning) light pollution research at USC undergraduate symposium

Lab Work in Knowable Magazine Profile

Reporter Stephanie Pain contributed an excellent summary of recent research on light pollution, “There Goes the Night,” with interviews and summaries of research from around the world.  Knowable Magazine is the partner publication to the Annual Reviews series, which recently published a review from the Gaston lab, Impacts of Artificial Light at Night on Biological Timings. … Continue reading Lab Work in Knowable Magazine Profile

Drivers of plant community structure on San Clemente Island

A third paper from our collaboration with Scott Loss and post-doc Shishir Paudel at Oklahoma State University has been published in Ecosphere.  This paper analyzes the vegetation data collected as Shishir searched for invasive earthworms on the island. Determinants of native and non-native plant community structure on an oceanic island Shishir Paudel, Juan C. Benavides, Beau MacDonald, Travis … Continue reading Drivers of plant community structure on San Clemente Island

How bright the moon: correcting a propagated figure error in the literature

Last year, the National Park Service released our report, Artificial night lighting and protected lands: Ecological effects and management approaches (Longcore and Rich 2016), which had been in the works for quite a while. Our colleague Andrej Mohar, while enthusiastic about the report overall, pointed out that a figure that we had included of natural … Continue reading How bright the moon: correcting a propagated figure error in the literature